Monday, 12 November 2018

Yesterday Uncovered - WW1 with Broken Faces by Deborah Carr




This month on Yesterday Uncovered we slip back to WW1 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of the Great War




During November there will be three authors talking about their books set in this period and one very special guest.



Sitting, in the shade, on a recliner at the side of my pool is Deborah Carr, the author of, Broken Faces, so please help yourself to a glass of chilled bubbly, a plate of tapas, then make yourself comfortable and enjoy slipping back to the time of WW1


Tell us a little about yourself

Thanks for inviting me, Pauline, it’s great to be here.

I live on the island of Jersey and can see the French coast from my bedroom window at night. My husband and I share our home with our three rescue dogs and my family believe that I’m slowly filling my house with these rescues to make up for my two children, now 27 and 24 having left home – I think they could be right.

I’ve written for years and Broken Faces was my debut novel set during WW1. HarperImpulse recently published my second novel set partially during this period, The Poppy Field, to commemorate the centenary of the end of WW1. I also write contemporary romance series as Georgina Troy and psychological suspense as Ella Drummond.


What inspired you to write about and around WW1?

My paternal great-grandfather, 2nd Lt Charles Wood of the 17th Lancers served in India, where my grandmother was born, and also in WW1. He died just before Christmas in 1922 and my great-grandmother was so upset that he’d left her – poor man, it wasn’t by choice – that she burnt all his photos. I was researching his life looking for a photo for my father who apparently looks like him. I never found that photo, but did find a love of the period and having ridden horses when I was growing up, setting a novel during the four years of that war about two cavalrymen and the two women in their lives seemed to make sense.




Tell us little about the story and its plot without giving too much away

The story is about four friends and how their lives are changed forever during the 1914-1918 war. Freddie Chevalier, is a farmer’s son from Jersey. He joins the Lancers to be with his closest school friend, Charles Baldwyn, a rather badly-behaved man from an aristocratic family. One of them is terribly injured. Charles is engaged to Meri, a wealthy American girl who Freddie is secretly in love with. Something happens between Meri and Freddie, which devastates Charles. Charles’ younger sister, Lexi is in love with Freddie, but although he’s fond of her, he still sees her as his best-friend’s younger sister, rather than the beautiful woman she has become. Meri becomes a nurse and Lexi a volunteer in the war effort and each of them soon discover that war is far more shocking than they had imagined.


Is any part of the story based on facts / real events?

I like to keep true to historical facts and always hope that a reader will not only enjoy reading my books but discover things they hadn’t previously known. I work out what historical events I would like to include in the book and write the story around them.


Are any of the characters based on someone real or are they pure fiction?

I’ve based Freddie on my paternal great-grandfather in that he’s in the Lancers and they’re both very good looking (or so we were told by my grandmother) and blonde. Charles’ family live at a beautiful estate in Shropshire and although none of the characters are like my ex-husband, his family do have a lovely estate and I based the Somerton Hall in the book on their home.


If research was necessary what did this involve?

I did a lot of research and took over a year to write this book. The hardest part about the research is what to leave out. Very little ends up in the book, but the research does help ensure that an essence of the period filters into the story, so the reader can have a sense of how it was to live during that time.

I did a lot of research online, some through very old books that I sourced through charitable book sales. I also visited Paris and was lucky enough to discover and be allowed into the building where the plaster-of-Paris masks written about in my book were made. It was surreal and memorable experience walking through the passage way, into a peaceful courtyard and up the wooden stairs retracing the steps of men from one hundred years ago as they went to have the plaster of Paris casts made of their damaged faces from which their masks were then made.




Website:  http://deborahcarr.org/



Thank you for stopping by and meeting Deborah.

Next Tuesday ...





You can also read...

Tears for the Fallen


Until next time, I hope the sun is shinning on your face and in your heart.


Pauline x

Saturday, 10 November 2018

Saturday Snap!

On this week's Saturday Snap, I just love how the water droplets caught the early morning sun from this leaking irrigation pipe



You can also keep up with my pictures on Instagram @paulinebarclay

Until next time, take care and I hope the sun is shining on your face and in your heart.


Pauline x 

Monday, 5 November 2018

Yesterday Uncovered - WW1 with Kit Domino and Tears For the Fallen




This month on Yesterday Uncovered we slip back to WW1 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of the Great War




During November there will be three authors talking about their books set in this period and one very special guest.


My special guest,  Kit Domino, opens November's Yesterday Uncovered.

Sitting, in the shade, on a recliner at the side of my pool is Kit Domino, the author of Every Step of the Way, but today Kit is talking about her specially commissioned painting for WW1, so please help yourself to a glass of chilled bubbly, a plate of tapas, then make yourself comfortable as we slip back to a time when the world went mad.


Thank you, Pauline, for such a warm welcome. It’s good to be back here in the sunshine.



Tell us a little about yourself

Although I am an author and have been a blogging on writing, gardening and cookery, among other topics, for some years, I only turned to painting a few years ago, purely by chance at a writing workshop weekend. Having had no formal training either in art or with acrylics, something clicked that day, and here I am now painting as a semi-professional with work sold in the UK, Canada, Australia, Spain, and Germany. In the New Year I will also be teaching Acrylics for Beginners at a local art group near to where I live in the UK.


What inspired you to paint this beautiful picture?



The Society for All Artist (the SAA), of which I am a member, decided to mark the 100th anniversary of the cessation of First World War hostilities by hosting a challenge to paint a poppy to form part of a large display in partnership with the Royal British Legion. Most of us had family who fought in that war, my own grandfather fighting in France. He survived, but many thousands never came home, thus I wanted my poppy to represent far more than a simple flower painting. As a result, “Tears for the Fallen” has a black background as a sign of mourning, a flower bud representing the young age of those called to arms, falling petals marking respect for those fallen, and teardrops shed by those who lost brothers, sons, uncles, fathers and more in that dreadful conflict.


Where can the painting be seen?

The painting measures 125x125mm and will form part of a larger SAA exhibition (date to be announced) both online and at their headquarters in Newark, UK.   


Will the painting be for sale?

The original painting will not be. I am, however, currently working on a larger, similar version, which will be available to purchase through my website.


Is there any chance people could buy a copy of this, for example in postcard or greeting card format?



Framed prints of “Tears for the Fallen” plus cards, postcards, bags, cushions etc can be purchased via my page on Redbubble.comhttps://www.redbubble.com/people/kitdominoart/portfolio?ref=carousel_portfolio.
Other items, i.e. pens and mousemats, ­will be made available via my website.




You can find Kit, her books and her fabulous paintings at all these places ….

Kit Domino Art website: https://kitdominoart.com/
Kit Domino Art on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kitdominoart
Kit Domino website: https://kitdomino.wordpress.com/



Thank you for stopping by and meeting Kit.

Next Tuesday ...






Until next time, I hope the sun is shinning on your face and in your heart.


Pauline x

Saturday, 3 November 2018

Saturday Snap - A Purfect Climb!

On this week's Saturday Snap, I could not resist photographing this cat who seemed determined to shimmy up this palm tree.




Until next time, take care and I hope the sun is shining on your face and in your heart.


Pauline x 

Monday, 29 October 2018

Yesterday Uncovered - 1960's with Rituals of the Dead by Jennifer S Alderson




This month on Yesterday Uncovered we slip back to the 1960s


Sitting, in the shade, on a recliner at the side of my pool is Jennifer S Alderson, the author of Rituals of the Dead, so please help yourself to a glass of chilled bubbly, a plate of tapas, then make yourself comfortable and enjoy slipping back to the 1960s.



Tell us a little about yourself

Hi, Pauline! Thanks for the inviting back to your blog! I am an American-born journalist, website developer and art historian currently living in the Netherlands. I write travel mysteries and thrilling adventures set in one of the many countries I have been lucky enough to visit. When I am not writing, you can find me biking around Amsterdam, in one of the city’s many museums, or sipping coffee on a canal while dreaming up my next book idea.


What inspired you to write about the 1960s?

My work as a collection researcher for the Tropenmuseum inspired me to write about the early 1960s. One of my assignments was finding photographs and films we could use in an exhibition of Asmat art. The Asmat live in South Papua, on the Indonesian half of the island Papua New Guinea. Until 1962, Papua was a Dutch colony known as Netherlands New Guinea.



Most of the objects displayed in the Tropenmuseum’s exhibition of Asmat art were collected by Dutch anthropologists, missionaries and explorers between 1952 and 1962. Though two of the poles were collected by American anthropologist Michael Rockefeller in 1961. They were later donated to the National Ethnography Museum in Leiden by his parents, to thank the Dutch government for their help in searching for their missing son. As you may already know, Rockefeller vanished in 1961 and has never been found. His disappearance is one of the most famous unsolved mysteries of our time. This connection between the Netherlands and Papua inspired me to write a dual-timeline mystery about artefact smuggling.



Tell us little about the story and its plot without giving too much away

In my novel, Zelda Richardson is a working at the Tropenmuseum as a collection researcher. When a missing anthropologist’s journal is found inside a crate containing an Asmat artifact, Zelda is tasked with finding out more about the anthropologist’s last days. Unfortunately for her, the man’s killer is willing to do anything to suppress her findings.



Is any part of the story based on facts / real events?

The story and cast of characters were directly inspired by Rockefeller’s disappearance and his connections with Dutch missionaries, but that is where fact ends and fiction begins.




Are any of the characters based on someone real or are they pure fiction?

According to the many journals and missionary’s reports I have read, Dutch New Guinea was one of the last wild frontiers. The unforgiving and extreme environment, overwhelming heat, plethora of deadly insects and reptiles, as well as the Asmat’s reputation as head hunters, attracted explorers, missionaries, anthropologists and adventurers in droves. All of the characters in my novel are conglomerations of those I have read about. None – not even my missing anthropologist – are based solely on one real person.


If research was necessary what did this involve?

This was a period of time I knew literally nothing about, before writing this story. Frankly, that’s what made it so much fun to write! In order to get a better feel for the environment, attitudes and politics of the era, extensive research was necessary. Luckily, I had already delved into many archives and audio-visual collections while researching the Asmat art exhibition in the Tropenmuseum, so I had a strong basis from which to begin.


 






Thanks again for inviting me back, Pauline!



Thank you for stopping by and meeting Jennifer

On Tuesday we start November's, Yesterday Uncovered with books that include WW1 as a tribute to 100 years since the end of the Great War.
During November there will be three authors and a special guest, so please come back and meet all these great people.











Until next time, I hope the sun is shinning on your face and in your heart.


Pauline

Saturday, 27 October 2018

Saturday Snap!

On this week's Saturday Snap, I share one of the thousands of photographs of Barney when he was a puppy! He was, and still is, adorable cute. 




Until next time, take care and I hope the sun is shining on your face and in your heart.


Pauline x 

Wednesday, 24 October 2018

Yesterday Uncovered - 1960's with Phillipa Nefri Clark &The Stationmaster's Cottage




This month on Yesterday Uncovered we slip back to the 1960s


Sitting, in the shade, on a recliner at the side of my pool is Phillipa Nefri Clark, the author of The Stationmaster’s Cottage so please help yourself to a glass of chilled bubbly, a plate of tapas, then make yourself comfortable and enjoy slipping back to the 1960s.


Tell us a little about yourself

Thanks, Pauline. With my two young adult sons, husband, and black Labrador, I live near in the Macedon Ranges in Victoria, Australia. We have a few acres and a family pet supplies business in our local small town. Now that I’m working less hours in the business, I am able to pour myself into what has been a lifelong obsession with writing fiction. In the past I’ve written everything from non-fiction to screenplays, but always return to novels.


What inspired you to write about the 1960s?

I’m a child of the 1960s and my early memories revolve around misty beaches, small towns, and secrets. We moved a lot and I was often left to my own devices which fuelled my imagination. Setting part of the book in those times was fitting.



Tell us little about the story and its plot without giving too much away

There are two stories, one set in the 1960s and one set in 2017, but they are connected through an old cottage in the seaside town of River’s End. Christie Ryan is a successful makeup artist who works in film and is shocked when her estranged grandmother leaves her the cottage. River’s End is the opposite of her life, yet she is drawn into a mystery revealed slowly and emotionally through letters she discovers in the attic.


Is any part of the story based on facts / real events?

The Stationmaster’s Cottage itself is based upon a real one close to where I live. It is as old and has seen many people and stories within its walls. I drew inspiration from two songs by Aussie group Icehouse (Man of Colours & Where the River Meets the Sea). Incidentally, Icehouse have both this book and its follow up.


Are any of the characters based on someone real or are they pure fiction?

Pure fiction, although many of my pet supplies shop customers enjoy speculating on who they might be based on.


If research was necessary what did this involve?

Although the scenes in 1960s Melbourne were short, I wanted to create a sense of the city and watched some very interesting old videos depicting life then. For River’s End (a fictional town), I chose to place it along the Great Ocean Road, so made several trips to the region and joined a number of social media sites about it. We have a wonderful historical site here called Trove, which is invaluable for writers of any history.



Please add all your social media links below and make them hyperlinks if you can.



Until next time, I hope the sun is shinning on your face and in your heart.


Pauline

Monday, 22 October 2018

Yesterday Uncovered - 1960's with Julia Ibbotson & Drumbeats




This month on Yesterday Uncovered we slip back to the 1960s


Sitting, in the shade, on a recliner at the side of my pool is Julia Ibbotson, the author of, Drumbeats so please help yourself to a glass of chilled bubbly, a plate of tapas, then make yourself comfortable and enjoy slipping back to the 1960s.




Tell us a little about yourself

Thank you, Pauline, for entertaining me again with bubbly by your pool! Well, as you know, I’m the author of best-selling award-winning books with my lovely publisher, Endeavour. Drumbeats, set in 1965, is a coming-of-age romance in the midst of civil war in Africa; there’s a spice of mystery too! It’s the first of a trilogy which follows my main character, Jess, through the decades, starting with the 1960s at age 18, when she goes off to Africa for a gap year, and moving on to the 1980s and 1990s. Actually, this is great timing, Pauline, because the last of the trilogy (Finding Jess) came out in July!  I originally self-published Drumbeats as an indie author but was delighted to be signed with Endeavour back in 2015.

I’ve just moved to writing fulltime, after a career in education, as a secondary school teacher (English and Drama) and a senior lecturer/researcher at university. It’s lovely to be able to manage my own time now – and to be able to go to ‘swim and gym’ every morning, walk in the countryside around my village, and chat to other writers over lunch at the RNA (Romantic Novelists Association) chapters. It all gives me inspiration. I just have to try to be disciplined about getting on with my writing, and not stop for too much coffee, social media and chocolate! I love having time to do the extensive research I do for all my books: I’m intrigued by history and time travel.


What inspired you to write about the 1960s?

I’ve always been fascinated by the 60s. Drumbeats brings in the music, fashion, and attitudes of English life back in the day. In many ways it was the decade that saw the start of so much in our world today. Yet we’ve moved on very significantly since then. It was also a time of innocence and naivety, despite all we read. Things weren’t as ‘out there’ as they are today; you didn’t discuss openly all sorts of things we do now: sex, mental health, abuse. There was a veneer of openness but so much was hidden and covered up. In Drumbeats I try to portray what this was like for an 18 year old from quite a strict English family life, now on the brink of the grown up world, caught in the turmoil and drama of West Africa.




Tell us little about the story and its plot without giving too much away

Imagine! - it’s 1965 and 18 year old Jess escapes her stifling English background for a gap year in Ghana, West Africa. But it’s a time of political turbulence across the region. Fighting to keep her young love who she believes is waiting for her back in England, she’s thrown into the physical dangers of civil war, tragedy … and the emotional conflict of a disturbing new relationship with Jim, an American medic. But why do the drumbeats haunt her dreams? And what is Jim really involved in?
This is a rite of passage story which takes the reader hand in hand with Jess on her journey towards growing into the world.


Is any part of the story based on facts / real events?

I did go to Ghana as a volunteer teacher and nurse, I did live in the 60s, and the political events of West Africa at that time (the civil wars etc) did happen. Some of Jess’s experiences in Ghana are based on mine. But further than that, I won’t confess!!

My next two books in the trilogy are also based on real historical events and social background and on some of my life experiences too or those of people around me: being close to someone with mental health issues, betrayal, divorce, but of course as a writer you change some things for creative licence. Readers are sometimes surprised at the things that happened to people (or things they put up with) in the 60s, and (as later in the trilogy) the 70s and 80s. It was a different world – but then, it’s history!




Are any of the characters based on someone real or are they pure fiction?

I think most writers base their characters on people they know, even slightly, or on something interesting about them, just as a book is more vivid if it’s set in a location that the writer knows well. Jess maybe has something of me at that age (18): adventurous, brave, yet quite dangerously na├»ve about the world.


If research was necessary what did this involve

I always love the research I do for every one of my books! I researched the 1960s just as much as I did for the Dark Ages for my mystery time-slip (A Shape on the Air), set in 499AD. For Drumbeats, I needed to be accurate about the 60s music, the fashions, the events of that period. I’m told that history starts 50 years ago, so certainly 1965 needs to be researched as such! And as it’s set in Ghana, I had to research the political events in a time of turbulence in West Africa.
I’m an avid reader, and for my own reading, I love books that show me a different historical period and location, especially if it’s exotic! I tried to make Drumbeats vivid so that readers could really feel that they were there.






Links to Julia and her books…

http://myBook.to/Drumbeatstrilogy    (buy-link on Amazon for ebook and paperback)
http://Author.to/JuliaIbbotsonauthor  (for all the Drumbeats trilogy on Amazon)
Twitter:  @Julia Ibbotson
https://www.pinterest.co.uk/juliai1    (inspiration pics that informed my books and research)
https://www.goodreads.com/juliaibbotson   (my Goodreads author page)




Thank you for stopping by and meeting Julia

On Thursday we meet Philippa Nefri Clarke talking about...











Until next time, I hope the sun is shinning on your face and in your heart.


Pauline